The Pocket Wife by Susan Crawford

The Pocket Wife is the tale of Dana Catrell, a woman with a history of psychological issues who one day drinks too much and may or may not have murdered her neighbor. Psychologically unreliable characters typically make the best characters, but this was not the case here. The protagonist is so very whiny that it is completely impossible to sympathize with her struggle. Continue reading…

Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi

I don’t know if this book is in Oprah’s rebooted reboot of her book club, but Helen Oyeyemi is clearly aspiring towards a coveted position there. From the dumb-but-attempting-to-be-deep title to the overabundance of complex human issues, Boy, Snow, Bird essentially makes a parody of itself from trying too hard. Spoilers ahead, but go ahead and read anyway; knowing their nature will stop you from wasting your time. Continue reading…

Accidents of Marriage by Randy Susan Meyers

Maddy is a social worker with a borderline abusive husband named Ben. He assaults her verbally, throws heirlooms at walls, and, at the very least, is a total asshole. He suffers from road rage and while driving recklessly he gets into a near-deadly accident in which he endures a few scrapes and Maddy sustains potentially devastating head injuries.  Continue reading…

The Slap by Christos Tsiolkas

My reasons for selecting a particular novel aren’t always the most noble or inspired. I chose The Slap because I saw a commercial for the TV show version and Zachary Quinto is in it. I love Zachary Quinto, the series is based on a book, and boom: I must read it. The Slap, in spite of its hideous title, is actually a rather provocative and intriguing novel that finds itself punctuated by crude and graphic sexual encounters. Continue reading…

Don’t Stand So Close by Luana Lewis

I have been trying to review Don’t Stand So Close on and off for almost a week. I have nothing to say about it; I feel nothing towards this book. Really, it makes me think of my husband. Steve is the champion of apathy. He rarely has strong feelings towards anything. When asked if he enjoyed a movie or liked a meal, 90% of the time his response is, “It’s not bad,” or “It’s alright.” Those are his catch phrases. If Steve were a doll with a crackly old voicebox, pulling a string would elicit those very phrases. The first thing that came to mind when I finished Don’t Stand So Close was “It’s alright,” which is a terrible way to feel about anything, let alone a book. I would much rather hate a book, or even love a book. Books should stimulate some kind of feeling – to generate nothing but indifference is truly one of the worst sins that an author can commit. Shame on you, Luana Lewis. Shame on you. Continue reading…

Evil Librarian by Michelle Knudsen

I have pretty low expectations anymore, but Evil Librarian is a surprisingly clever YA novel that actually exceeded those – albeit modest – expectations. It still tends to be a bit repetitive and long-winded; but for the most part, Michelle Knudsen’s journey to Hell is a rewarding read. Continue reading…

The Last Girlfriend on Earth and Other Love Stories by Simon Rich

It seems that as a woman, I am obligated to hate this book. Female Goodreads reviewers consistently label the collection as full of “gender stereotyping” and “easily accessible sexism.” I admit that my sense of humor can lean towards the low-brow. I also know that I tend to love things that feminists hate. Regardless, I found The Last Girlfriend on Earth and Other Love Stories was highly entertaining. Continue reading…